Jean Baudrillard

Jean Baudrillard's bold and innovative reflections on the mass media, consumption and history brought him a wide audience as one of the most stimulating social theorists of the late twentieth century. Combining provocative political analysis, most memorably encapsulated in his controversial statement that the Gulf War 'did not take place', with a remarkable command of semiotics and Marxist theory, Baudrillard became a leading poststructuralist analyst of mass communication and its implications for late capitalism, which his seminal work Simulacra and Simulation examined by developing the concept of 'hyperreality'. He taught sociology at the University of Paris X (Nanterre) from 1966 to 1987, but his contentious and challenging work continued until the end of his life, as he expanded his analysis of the hyperreal paradoxes of modernity to subjects as diverse as 9/11, television, sex and death in books like Cool Memories II and Cool Memories V, both published by Polity. Polity also published his Selected Writings.