What is the History of Emotions?

By Barbara H. Rosenwein and Riccardo Cristiani

Aren’t emotions the same now as they have always been? Weren’t they hardwired in us from the Stone Age on? The answer to both questions is a simple No. Psychologists, neuropsychologists, historians, and sociologists are increasingly recognizing the mutability of human emotional life. … Read More

A History of Childhood, 2nd Edition

I welcomed the opportunity to produce a second edition of A History of Childhood for Polity, given that it is now sixteen years since the original first appeared. The new edition retains the aim of writing a wide-ranging introduction to the history of childhood, going back to the early medieval … Read More

Thoughts on a critique of sex addiction

Since the late 1990s, I have been teaching an undergraduate course on the history of sex. Students are fascinated by the topic. They are open to the idea that homosexualities have a history, that heterosexuality and pornography are relatively modern sexual constructs, that we can talk of a period of
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The twin tales of Russian history

Studying imperial Russia, scholars have produced two stories. One concerns a great country that competes successfully, though unevenly, with other European powers, produces brilliant literature, and stages unprecedented social experiments. The other story is one of economic backwardness, unbridled violence, misery, illiteracy, despair, and collapse. I subscribe to both of … Read More

Re-interpreting Hayden White

Hayden White counts as the most influential contemporary philosopher of history. He is often praised and criticized for his “narrativist” approach to the study of history. Among historians and literary scholars in particular, the name of White is almost synonymous with a “linguistic” or “narrative” turn in historical studies. Few … Read More

Re-interpreting Hayden White

Hayden White counts as the most influential contemporary philosopher of history. He is often praised and criticized for his “narrativist” approach to the study of history. Among historians and literary scholars in particular, the name of White is almost synonymous with a “linguistic” or “narrative” turn in historical studies. Few … Read More

Nabil Dajani on the Arab origins of print media

Several researchers of the Arab print media inaccurately claim that Islam prohibited printing and assume that printing began with Gutenberg. Thus they begin their study of Arab print media from the period of what I consider to be the dark age of the Arab world, the demise of the Ottoman … Read More