Don’t Ignore Conspiracy Theories

By Quassim Cassam

How can you not be a conspiracy theorist? It is a fact that people sometimes conspire and history books are full of stories of conspiracies by politicians and others. If you believe these obvious truths, doesn’t that make you a conspiracy theorist? Not exactly. The conspiracy theories … Read More

Canguilhem

By Stuart Elden

On Valentine’s day 1966, Louis Althusser wrote to his translator and lover Franca Madonia, mentioning that he had met up with Georges Canguilhem, his former teacher. Canguilhem was described by Althusser as “one of our old masters, a fierce man, angry, shy and violent, who convinced himself, … Read More

The Joy of Missing Out

by Svend Brinkmann , author of The Joy of Missing Out

We live in a world full of choice and temptation, where we are constantly bombarded with invitations, in the broadest sense of the word, via everything from street advertising to social media. We are constantly invited to do something, … Read More

Pain: A Sociological Introduction

Whenever I mention that I have written a book on the sociology of pain the most common reaction is “What is the connection between sociology and pain?” This was also the initial reaction of many students whom I taught on pain management programmes and courses, which was one of the … Read More

What is the History of Emotions?

By Barbara H. Rosenwein and Riccardo Cristiani

Aren’t emotions the same now as they have always been? Weren’t they hardwired in us from the Stone Age on? The answer to both questions is a simple No. Psychologists, neuropsychologists, historians, and sociologists are increasingly recognizing the mutability of human emotional life. … Read More

Understanding the Life Course

What makes us live or die the way we do or often survive to such an old age today? Is it biology/genetics or society/culture which decide our life pathways? Alternatively, are our lives a result of the complicated and often unclear interactions between biology and the environment? Are we therefore … Read More

How can psychology inform high-quality, patient-centered care?

Increasingly, nurses, alongside other healthcare professionals are under public and political scrutiny.  In recent years, there have been high profile cases of  failures of care leading to high mortality rates, where care staff have been described as showing a “disturbing lack of compassion towards patients” (Francis, 2013).  One of the … Read More

Death and Dying in America by Andrea Fontana and Jennifer Reid Keene

As we write this blog we are coping with the aftermath of the tragedy in Haiti. The latest count is an estimated 230,000 deaths and rising.  Haiti happened too late to be included in our book but it reflects its scope–trying to understand and explain who dies, how we die, … Read More